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Five Video Game Elements That Cannot Be Done In The Real World

Ah, video games. We all love to play them on weekly or daily basis (based on our schedules). As gamers, we can be engrossed in them for hours and hours. A great game can make time pass by until we realize we have to go back to the real world. Despite how much fun we have, there are certain elements in gameplay that we love to have but we can’t get away with in the real world.

I’m not saying these features are a bad thing. I know they are necessary because they help the fictional story progress, but it is fun to sit back, look at these ideas, and laugh about them if they had real world applications. That is why I dedicate this article to five video game features that are impossible in the real world because we can’t achieve them, they are ridiculous, or would land us in a world of trouble.

FAST TRAVEL

fast Travel

In huge open world games, fast travel seems to be a necessity. Games, like Skyrim, Fallout, WoW, Assassin’s Creed, etc., have huge worlds that traveling on foot would take an immense amount of time. Fast Travel helps us with side quests, story progression, and anything else we want to see or do in video games. This game feature is fun and simple to use, but I feel a bit spoiled when I return to the real world. I would love to have a fast travel ability for my daily commute to and from work on the NJ Turnpike. If Fast Travel were real, I am sure each and every gamer would utilize the function so they can get extra sleep, or spend an extra few minutes playing video games. But alas, Fast Travel only works in video games.

OPEN LOOT IN ROLE PLAYING GAME TOWNS AND BUILDINGS

looting homes

Many RPG Gamers know that a town or city means one of three things in an RPG: Saves and restoration, Story progression, and free loot in strangers’ houses. RPG fans know to check each and every house in a town because we can find a treasure chest or box that contains, potions, powerful weapons, or money for the big quest. At a certain point of the game, this concept is more habit forming because we know something is there for the gamer. We don’t even have to talk to the NPCs who live in the house. We just walk in and open the chest. While this is common for RPG games, this type of action would land us in jail if we ever tried this with people in our neighborhood. We can’t just walk into some stranger’s house, open up drawers, and take whatever we need in an attempt to save the world. We would spend a great deal of our free time behind bars.

I can only try imagine the bizarre logic of the NPCs (if they existed) if some stranger walked in and looted the place.

“Hey, I did not hear a knock when you entered my door but come on in. I guess being a hero means manners go out the window. What’s that? You’re going through my dresser and looking through my personal belongings? You found 800 dollars and you’re keeping it? Well I was saving that for things like: medicine if I got ill, needed it for house repairs, or if I wanted to retire. But hey, you walked into my house and found it, so I guess it is now yours. Have a great day thief.”

Open loot in a video game is an impossible action to accomplish in reality.

DAMAGE AND INSTANT HEALING

Video game characters take a lot of damage as they progress through the game. It makes us often question how tough the character is or how bad we are because the reality of gunshot and stab wounds is completely different from the video game world. I played videogames where the hero took an intense amount of pain and torture and still save the day with finesse.  Heroes can take just as much as they can dish out when it comes to damage and health, but this notion doesn’t really apply to us in the real world. When we get shot by an NPC in a FPS, we can take that bullet and keep going. In the real world, we seek medical transportation after the first shot, stab wound, or point of damage because we all know the seriousness of getting first aid to avoid losing too much blood, infections, and mortal wounds.

Games definitely create the line of separation because we know healing our bodies doesn’t work the same way as video games. Eating herbs, using first aid sprays, and simply waiting behind the corner for instant healing when we are so close to death only applies to video games. In a sense, it does help us to feel invincible when going up against a horde of endless enemies. Which is why I put this game element into my list of things we simply can’t do in video games.

CARRY EVERYTHING IN OUR BACK POCKET

world-of-warcraft inventory bag

One thing video games do is give the player a plethora of items to use in our quest to save the video game world. We can carry a thousand different potions, a walk-in closet full of different wardrobes for any battle condition, and a variety of weapons in case one weapon won’t work against a particular foe. While this notion isn’t a concern to me, the concept of carrying all this in one pocket makes me laugh.

Carrying all these items with ease is not something we can do in real life. In the real world, we look at the materials we carry to work or the things we pack for a vacation and we look like chumps compared to the video game avatars we create. I pack my keys, wallet, phone, and water for a daily jog and I need an over the shoulder backpack for all the stuff. This is why I laugh when I look at my character walking around with ease even though the character has over 90 magi health potions in the item pouch.

TRAVERSE ANY OBSTACLE WITH EASE

parkour

Now this one is mainly on me folks but I am sure we can all relate to this at some point in our lives. We see many protagonists adept in parkour or free running and we can understand the need for it in video games. It is all simple fun, but have you ever tried to learn parkour? Have to gone to a gym to try and get yourself physically tone to run up a building like any assassin from an Assassin’s Creed game?

I decided to try it out just to see if I can pull it off. For those who haven’t tried, it does require a lot of exercising and upper body strength to complete.  While I exercise and build myself up every day, I do enjoy eating sinfully delicious foods like bacon. I suppose I could work harder and give off bacon to improve myself in order to scale an apartment complex. If I had to choose between being able to scale an urban building with ease and a bacon cheeseburger, I will chose bacon every time. Sorry Assassins, you’ll have to save the world while I am on my couch with bacon.

Well here are just five elements about video games that aren’t so simple in video games. Now there are a lot more far-fetched gaming concepts out there and I invite you to share which concept you think are a bit ridiculous. Feel free to post one, and describe your thoughts on the matter.

Happy gaming everyone!

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My Top 5 “Guilty Pleasure” Games

We all have them. Maybe it was a childhood game or one that you are just exceptionally good at. No one you know likes the game or they may even tease you for playing it, but that never made it any less fun. These are my top five games that I know are terrible, but I love playing them anyway.

5. Advent Rising

For those who missed this game nearly a decade ago, Advent Rising is a sci-fi shooter with, in my opinion, a very entertaining story. To sum it up quickly, you are a space pilot encountering your first alien contact, they inform you that humans are gods, another race of aliens appear, and BOOM you are one of the last two humans in existence. You spend the game learning human-god abilities and taking down alien bad guys.

Why it’s Bad: The powers render the guns in the game completely obsolete when you upgrade them. At the same time, you upgrade a power by using it and one blasting ability turns into an all-powerful Kamehameha wave.

Why it’s Awesome: The story is pretty awesome, which is not very common. Also… uh… oh! FREAKING KAMEHAMEHA WAVES! Seriously, you can one-shot spaceships with that thing! Ending entire waves of enemies in an instant, Goku style; how could that not be awesome?

4. Mario Party

There are many versions of this game, and there will probably be many more, but they all have the same basic concept so I’m lumping them together. It’s basically a board game where the players move around the board and play mini-games to earn coins. The coins are used to buy items and stars, and the player with the most stars wins.

Why it’s Bad: The same reason that I am lumping Mario Party games together is one of the major flaws of the series. There may be more than ten games in the series (counting handheld games) but it is difficult to discern one from another as they are so similar. It’s the same game over and over. Also the series of Mario Party is quite firmly in the genre of “casual games” with no real incentive to play the whole game.

Why it’s Awesome: There is nothing quite like the face of utter defeat on any opponent children’s faces; perhaps an annoying cousin, or younger sibling. They can’t exactly play Halo or other similar games so just break out the Mario Party game and let the passive aggressivism flow through you.

3. Harvest Moon

Harvest Moon is a series of games in which your character starts up a farm and raises crops and animals for money. You can upgrade equipment, mine, fish, and other things as well. There is also a story to follow which usually involves a scavenger of crops, food, or other things that can only be obtained in a certain season. There’s also the option to marry and have kids.

Why it’s Bad: Simply put, Harvest moon is very repetitive and stressful. You have to water your plants. Then care for your animals. Crap, you left your tool in the house. Now that’s done maybe I’ll fish. Day is done, bed time. Now water the crops… How did three hours just pass by?!

Why it’s Awesome: Have you ever had those hard or depressing days and you just don’t feel like playing an annoying shooter or a game with the difficulty of “1/4 of a level costs at least 20 of your lives” (I’m looking at you Dark Souls), Harvest Moon is the perfect casual game. There’s not a lot of action, your character doesn’t die, you spending the day petting a cow; the simple videogame life. The fact that I’m sucker for business-type, buying and selling games might also play into this.

2. Browser Games

Those free games on the internet, contained on hundreds of websites; Shooters, RPGs, launching, upgrades, and a plethora of other genres flood the internet from established and aspiring videogame creators. You can find everything from fighting zombies to playing a puzzle online.

Why it’s Bad: A good 90% of the games out there are really not worth playing. After many hours roaming the internet for games to play I can say that the vast majority are flawed, bugged, too short, don’t make sense, or are not entertaining at all. It’s a sea of crappy games that drowns your time away.

Why it’s Awesome: The other 10% are what makes up for the rest. I’ve had more fun playing a few hours of a good browser game then I have from playing a 60 dollar over the counter game for weeks. A lot of the browser games offer comedic moments that can’t really be found elsewhere.

1. Minesweeper

This game is on almost every computer everywhere and has been for a very long time. It’s the classic puzzle game where numbers show you how many mines are adjacent to a space. Theoretically, it is very simple; but it turns out to be a lot harder than it sounds.

Why it’s Bad: This game has been around so long that it is often considered just a frustrating game to play if the internet and cable went out, your consoles exploded, all your books spontaneously combusted, and all other possible hobbies/time killers met their untimely demise at the same time. Also, a lot of the game depends on luck on the harder levels which can be extremely infuriating for those who are spending their time to try and solve it.

Why it’s Awesome: This game can be extremely relaxing when the player gets the hang of it. I have played this game for hours at a time, and sometimes still do, because it is numbingly distracting. However, while being relaxing, it still poses a challenge and so doesn’t become boring, at least not to me. It is one of those few games that finds a medium of relaxation and challenge that keeps me interested.