Categories
PC News PC Previews Playstation 4 News Playstation 4 Previews X-Box One News X-Box One Previews

Activision and Infinity Ward Release Brand New Story Trailer for Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare

Today, Activision and Infinity Ward released a brand new story trailer gives fans a glimpse into the narrative featured in Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare’s rich story campaign. The game returns to the roots of the series for a classic war story that, for the first time in franchise history, extends beyond the reaches of Earth into the vast expanse of our solar system.

The trailer also features the first in-game footage of actor Kit Harington, who plays Admiral Salen Kotch of the Settlement Defense Front, and UFC fighter Conor McGregor, who plays Captain Bradley Fillion of the Settlement Defense Front.

maxresdefault2_700x394

Additionally, fans can pre-order the game to get access to the Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Multiplayer Beta that begins October 14, first on PlayStation 4.

For more information, fans can check out: www.callofduty.com , www.youtube.com/callofduty or follow @CallofDuty and @InfinityWard on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare is scheduled for release November 4th on PlayStation 4 system, Xbox One, and PC.

View the explosive new trailer below!

 

Categories
Playstation 4 Playstation 4 Reviews X-Box One X-Box One Reviews

Screencheat Review

Screencheat Review:

After years of peaking at a friend or family member’s section of the screen on a first person shooter I finally find myself being rewarded for something I wasn’t “supposed to do.” In the N64 era of shooters, you had four squares and a golden gun. Now, in the 2016 era of shooters, you have a high speed internet connection and millions of friends and like minded gamers to play with. Today “screen lookers” have been made obsolete with the technological advancements in gaining and the availability of having your own console and monitor. Even if you go to your local LAN party most people bring their own gear, and we are seeing that a lot of the triple A high profile shooters are doing away with split screen and couch co-op. But if you thought split screen multiplayer was going away for ever you are in luck because Screencheat brings back the feeling of sharing the space with other players and with an interesting twist on gameplay rewards you for taking a little peek to see where the other players are.

As a matter of fact “screen looking” is the key gameplay mechanic. Each player, whether it be a friend or a computer controlled bot, has their own little space on the screen. And the best part is they are invisible! That’s right, the only thing you can see is your gun. This makes it an absolute necessity to look at the other player’s screen. One would think that would be easy but I found it quite challenging to get used to. I remember a time where I would quickly and quietly glance at another player’s screen just to get a leg up on where they were at and racing to them to take them out only to turn around and deny that I ever did it. Now Screencheat forces you to rely solely on doing just that. Sharing the screen with up to 8 players makes for an interesting, but sometimes frustrating experience.

screenshot3_620x322

The environment means everything in this game. Each level is broken down into sections consisting of a few colors. Long hallways, staircases, elevators, and moving platforms are all covered by their own bare and basic color palate. Each map has its own special obstacles, but none of them were truly special or really stood out. Sure I had my favorite (The Garden) but none of the levels will be remembered as iconic or a must play. There were not a lot of spawn points either, so more often than not I would respawn in an 8 man battle only to be thwarted almost instantly, but occasionally landing a double or triple kill with only being able to see the smoke seeping from an enemy’s freshly fired gun barrel was very satisfying.

Being that this is a first person shooter the gunplay is what is most important and screencheat is a very boring shooter. The arsenal is unique and silly ranging from a small pistol, a candlestick, and a grenade launcher all the way to a wooden sword and horse that leaves a trail of fire behind you when charging your opponent. The shooting doesn’t feel good at all but in a way the game makes up for it with these corky weapons like a teddy bear bomb. All in all it remains a very fun shooting experience, just not a very good one.

screenshot9_620x322

A fresh new take on the first person shooter genre coupled with a goofy arsenal makes Screencheat an overall fun game. It offers traditional 4 player split screen fun, as well as the ability to add bots making it up to 8 players at once which keeps things pretty interesting. Although being invisible in a FPS is not my preferred method of play, I really enjoyed myself and welcomed the challenge. Online multiplayer, several familiar game modes, and a slew of timed trails leaves you with plenty of content to keep you satisfied all while expanding on the thrill of looking at another player’s screen.
Proven Score 7/10

Categories
Opinions

Five Video Game Elements That Cannot Be Done In The Real World

Ah, video games. We all love to play them on weekly or daily basis (based on our schedules). As gamers, we can be engrossed in them for hours and hours. A great game can make time pass by until we realize we have to go back to the real world. Despite how much fun we have, there are certain elements in gameplay that we love to have but we can’t get away with in the real world.

I’m not saying these features are a bad thing. I know they are necessary because they help the fictional story progress, but it is fun to sit back, look at these ideas, and laugh about them if they had real world applications. That is why I dedicate this article to five video game features that are impossible in the real world because we can’t achieve them, they are ridiculous, or would land us in a world of trouble.

FAST TRAVEL

fast Travel

In huge open world games, fast travel seems to be a necessity. Games, like Skyrim, Fallout, WoW, Assassin’s Creed, etc., have huge worlds that traveling on foot would take an immense amount of time. Fast Travel helps us with side quests, story progression, and anything else we want to see or do in video games. This game feature is fun and simple to use, but I feel a bit spoiled when I return to the real world. I would love to have a fast travel ability for my daily commute to and from work on the NJ Turnpike. If Fast Travel were real, I am sure each and every gamer would utilize the function so they can get extra sleep, or spend an extra few minutes playing video games. But alas, Fast Travel only works in video games.

OPEN LOOT IN ROLE PLAYING GAME TOWNS AND BUILDINGS

looting homes

Many RPG Gamers know that a town or city means one of three things in an RPG: Saves and restoration, Story progression, and free loot in strangers’ houses. RPG fans know to check each and every house in a town because we can find a treasure chest or box that contains, potions, powerful weapons, or money for the big quest. At a certain point of the game, this concept is more habit forming because we know something is there for the gamer. We don’t even have to talk to the NPCs who live in the house. We just walk in and open the chest. While this is common for RPG games, this type of action would land us in jail if we ever tried this with people in our neighborhood. We can’t just walk into some stranger’s house, open up drawers, and take whatever we need in an attempt to save the world. We would spend a great deal of our free time behind bars.

I can only try imagine the bizarre logic of the NPCs (if they existed) if some stranger walked in and looted the place.

“Hey, I did not hear a knock when you entered my door but come on in. I guess being a hero means manners go out the window. What’s that? You’re going through my dresser and looking through my personal belongings? You found 800 dollars and you’re keeping it? Well I was saving that for things like: medicine if I got ill, needed it for house repairs, or if I wanted to retire. But hey, you walked into my house and found it, so I guess it is now yours. Have a great day thief.”

Open loot in a video game is an impossible action to accomplish in reality.

DAMAGE AND INSTANT HEALING

Video game characters take a lot of damage as they progress through the game. It makes us often question how tough the character is or how bad we are because the reality of gunshot and stab wounds is completely different from the video game world. I played videogames where the hero took an intense amount of pain and torture and still save the day with finesse.  Heroes can take just as much as they can dish out when it comes to damage and health, but this notion doesn’t really apply to us in the real world. When we get shot by an NPC in a FPS, we can take that bullet and keep going. In the real world, we seek medical transportation after the first shot, stab wound, or point of damage because we all know the seriousness of getting first aid to avoid losing too much blood, infections, and mortal wounds.

Games definitely create the line of separation because we know healing our bodies doesn’t work the same way as video games. Eating herbs, using first aid sprays, and simply waiting behind the corner for instant healing when we are so close to death only applies to video games. In a sense, it does help us to feel invincible when going up against a horde of endless enemies. Which is why I put this game element into my list of things we simply can’t do in video games.

CARRY EVERYTHING IN OUR BACK POCKET

world-of-warcraft inventory bag

One thing video games do is give the player a plethora of items to use in our quest to save the video game world. We can carry a thousand different potions, a walk-in closet full of different wardrobes for any battle condition, and a variety of weapons in case one weapon won’t work against a particular foe. While this notion isn’t a concern to me, the concept of carrying all this in one pocket makes me laugh.

Carrying all these items with ease is not something we can do in real life. In the real world, we look at the materials we carry to work or the things we pack for a vacation and we look like chumps compared to the video game avatars we create. I pack my keys, wallet, phone, and water for a daily jog and I need an over the shoulder backpack for all the stuff. This is why I laugh when I look at my character walking around with ease even though the character has over 90 magi health potions in the item pouch.

TRAVERSE ANY OBSTACLE WITH EASE

parkour

Now this one is mainly on me folks but I am sure we can all relate to this at some point in our lives. We see many protagonists adept in parkour or free running and we can understand the need for it in video games. It is all simple fun, but have you ever tried to learn parkour? Have to gone to a gym to try and get yourself physically tone to run up a building like any assassin from an Assassin’s Creed game?

I decided to try it out just to see if I can pull it off. For those who haven’t tried, it does require a lot of exercising and upper body strength to complete.  While I exercise and build myself up every day, I do enjoy eating sinfully delicious foods like bacon. I suppose I could work harder and give off bacon to improve myself in order to scale an apartment complex. If I had to choose between being able to scale an urban building with ease and a bacon cheeseburger, I will chose bacon every time. Sorry Assassins, you’ll have to save the world while I am on my couch with bacon.

Well here are just five elements about video games that aren’t so simple in video games. Now there are a lot more far-fetched gaming concepts out there and I invite you to share which concept you think are a bit ridiculous. Feel free to post one, and describe your thoughts on the matter.

Happy gaming everyone!

Categories
PC Previews Playstation Vita Previews

Umbrella Corps 2nd Trailer Drops

Capcom has revealed a new trailer for Resident Evil Umbrella Corps and it’s everything we NEVER loved about the Resident Evil universe.

Fast paced competitive shooter is not what comes to mind when you say Resident Evil, and with past titles such as Operation Raccoon City being underwhelming, despite selling pretty well, Capcom is still pushing for that “Call of Duty” experience. But will this finally be the game that takes off? With Esports becoming a bigger deal, and more and more companies such as EA placing a huge emphasis on competitive gaming, does Capcom have what it takes to grab a price of that market with the latest entry in the Resident Evil franchise?


With the second trailer, Capcom plays off nostalgia a great bit. The setting is in Resident Evil Four’s notorious village where we were first introduced to the Las Plagas. RE4 is often referred to as the best in the series so it makes perfect sense to play on the nostalgia of a successful game to grab the core fan base and get their attention on Umbrella Corps. But will it take off? The fast paced, action packed trailer shows off several familiar enemies such as Las Plagas, zombie dogs, and what appeared to be crows attacking the very generic looking Umbrellas soldier. Graphically, it looked pretty impressive, and if the trailer was any indication of the actual game play, than fast paced is an understatement. There was something else that deserves to be mentioned. After promoting the team based, strategic multiplayer, Capcom showed off a single player challenge mode. There is no information on whether it is an “offline” experience, but hats off to Capcom for taking notice to the growing number of online only multiplayer shooters with no single player modes or campaigns and at least promoting this option in the short trailer. With a May release window, we can only hope that more light will be shed on the single player aspect of the game, because, let’s be honest, the foundation of Resident Evil is built in the single player experience. Multiplayer only is a huge risk, especially for an Resident Evil game. And, of course, what better way to end this two minute video than with a glimpse into the next play on nostalgia with a quick look of the Resident Evil five themed area.

With a release window of May 2016, we can only hope that more details are released about this game. Umbrella Corps is currently set to release across North America and Europe at $29.99/€29.99/£24.99 on PC and PlayStation 4.

Categories
PC Previews Playstation 3 Previews Playstation 4 Previews X-Box One Previews XBOX 360 Previews

Call of Duty: Black Ops III Preview

With less than a week to the release of the much anticipated Call of Duty: Black Ops III, now is as good a time as ever to look at what players can expect from the newest entry in the series. Every year developer Activision’s highly successful franchise adds both new features and gameplay tweaks to continue to keep the long running series fun and exciting. This year’s entry seems no different.

Black_Ops_3_SP_In_Darkness_WM-720x405_4_620x322

Black Ops III seems to be continuing the series trend of taking place in futuristic environments, much like every title since Black Ops II, which is great in my opinion. Advanced Warfare and Black Ops II’s futuristic settings were the most appealing story-wise since the original Modern Warfare. The sci-fi aspects of these future battlefields allow for storytelling that is hard to accomplish with modern day settings. It allows the developers to develop new weapons and technology, that isn’t present in a modern day setting, to enhance gameplay. In this title the characters are even augmented, in a way reminiscent of Deus Ex, which should allow for interesting twists to gameplay.

One of the most interesting new features of Treyarch’s upcoming shooter is the campaign being designed for co-op play. Some of the fondest memories I have of the Call of Duty series are of the spec ops missions in Modern Warfare 2. Sitting on the couch with my wife playing the game split-screen, running through these missions, was extremely fun. I hope the co-op campaign structure of Black Ops III delivers the same level of joy.

Interestingly, there are two changes in the campaign that I find odd (though I can see purpose within the first of the two). All campaign missions will be unlocked from the get go this time around. Since multiplayer is the main aspect of Call of Duty games that most players enjoy, this new feature allows players to experience campaign missions that friends may brag about being great without having to play through the whole game. The second of the two changes is the exclusion of a campaign in last-gen versions of the game. Though this seems to be an odd design choice, it may be due to time restrictions.

Black-Ops-3_Stronghold_Broken-Arrow_WM-720x405_620x322

After playing the beta for Black Ops III, I can say that the game boasts the same tight gameplay experience that fans have come to enjoy with the series. Black Ops III‘s gameplay felt similar to Black Ops II in my opinion, though it was much smoother and had a Titanfall-esque flare to it. Black Ops III allows for players to utilize jumping abilities similar to what we received in last years Advanced Warfare. Player opinion continues to be a split among fans of the series; some players loved the jump mechanics whereas others hated them. To me, the mechanic adds a new layer of strategy to the game and I am glad that it is returning.

There are also happens to be a lot more customization options available for players this time around. Among these options are super soldier classes, such as “Call Sign: Prophet” and “Call Sign: Nomad.” These two new classes offer special abilities outside of the regular gun customization or killstreak perks. It reminds me of the way your characters can have different abilities in titles like Borderlands or even Destiny—a welcomed addition should this new gameplay mechanic be balanced correctly.

The multiplayer experience of Call of Duty continues to evolve to keep the game fresh. Where some players may feel that old titles off the pristine version of the multiplayer experience, I enjoy the new experience offered every year with the various changes made to the series. As long as Activision keeps the experience fresh, Call of Duty will remain at the top.

cod-bo3-02-720x405_620x322

 

Call of Duty‘s beloved zombie mode, Treyarch’s bread and butter, returns in Black Ops III as well. Every iteration of the series has offered some type of horde or mission mode since World at War was released and zombies is the king of these modes. Zombie mode is thrilling and nail biting, but remains fun. The teamwork involved has continually kept me coming back to Black Ops II three years since it was released and I hope that this version delivers as well.

This year’s iteration includes a progression system, which allows players to build up their characters and not have to start from scratch on every play through. This could be a welcoming addition, though half of the fun is earning power-ups throughout each match of zombies mode. Abilities this time are served to players through a bubble gum machine—which is campy, but so is zombie mode, so it fits. Like previous versions of this staple game mode, new celebrity vocal talents like Ron Pearlman and Jeff Goldblum are joining the fight agains the undead. Zombies looks destined to deliver.

All in all, the package looks well worth the wait, especially on current-gen platforms. The campaign is darker than ever, the multiplayer is fast and tight, and zombie mode looks like a blast. The Black Ops series has been a fan favorite since Treyarch established it, and this one seem like it will continue that tradition. November 6th is just around the corner, so we will see if they live up to the standards that have been set. But, as of this moment, all signs point to yes.